Jen Allan Photography

Town Area

The Town area represents a typical North Eastern market town of the years prior to the First Word War.

 

Main Street 

 

Barclay & Company was formed in 1896 when 20 private banks were amalgamated. The Bank is a four-storey building; the Imperial Red granite frontage is typical of banks of the period. The banking hall is the best surviving example of the period.

 

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Freemasonry formed an integral part of society. A masonic Temple is situated next to the bank. The frontage is from the Park Terrace Masonic Temple at Sunderland. It had been in use from 1869 until 1932.

 

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The Beamish Motor and Cycle Works is a typical town garage of the pre-First World War period. Most spare parts were made in the workshop, petrol sold in two-gallon cans, and headlamps and horns were supplied as 'extras'!

 

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The Jubilee Confectioner's has a beautiful mahogany fitted interior, of which I have no images, unfortunately. The shelves are stacked with traditional glass jars full of sweets. In the factory behind the shop sweets are made, in the traditional way using huge copper boiling pans.

 

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News headlines from 1913 are displayed outside the shop, and upstairs a jobbing printer produces various stationery for local customers. Again, I have no images available for the upstairs - far too many people in there to get good shots!

 

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The Sun Inn;  situated to the left of the printer's, separated by the entrance to stables and courtyard.

 

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Ravensworth Terrace

A row of Georgian style houses, originally from Bensham in Gateshead, was built between 1830 and 1845. These were built for professional people and tradesmen.

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Number 2 represents the home of Miss Florence Smith, a teacher of singing, piano and elocution. She inherited this house from her parents and has made few changes. The furniture and furnishings are from the earlier Victorian period, and is lit by oil lamps. There is no bathroom in this house. Each bedroom would have a washstand, the maid of all work had to carry coal and water to each room.

Music lessons were given in the parlour; the kitchen floor is laid with flags, cooking was done on the cast iron range.

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At number 3 the downstairs parlour is used as a Dentist's waiting room; upstairs is the surgery, recovery room and technician's workshop. Upstairs a corridor leads from the surgery to the dentist's own home which is very elegantly furnished. Unlike the music teacher, the dentist had a bathroom. A stained glass window is featured on the stairs; strangely, this one is not as ornate as the one next door in the teacher's house. The nursery at the front of the house is furnished with toys of the period. The parlour is elegantly furnished, and I finish with some images of the kitchen.

 

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The office is typical of many legal practices in the 1900s, and is very old-fashioned for 1913 - they have a distinctly Dickensian feel

 

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The Co-operative Store

This is a very interesting part of the Town area, and there is a separate section which covers the history and images of this building.

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